20th August 2019

CG Fry & Son sees continued rise in purchasers using Help to Buy scheme

A recent comment from the new Secretary of State for Housing appeared to consider the possibility of the Help to Buy scheme being extended beyond 2023, when he was quoted saying ‘all options are on the table’.

As testament to the continued popularity of the scheme, and in accordance with the latest national Help to Buy statistics, regional housebuilder CG Fry & Son has confirmed a rise in purchasers using it at its developments across the region. 

As properties below a threshold of £600,000 qualify for the scheme, a large proportion of the properties at the developments are available to purchasers who wish to take advantage before the scheme is scheduled to end in 2021 for all buyers and in 2023 for first time buyers. 

Caroline Hill, Sales and Marketing Director for CG Fry & Son, comments: “There are still many people who are unaware that it’s not only first-time buyers who can use using Help to Buy. 

“Prospective buyers now have a wide range of options whether they are looking to take a step onto the property ladder or move into a larger home. However, I would urge anyone eligible to use the scheme to be mindful of the approaching deadline.  

“Across our developments we have seen an increase in the number of buyers who are choosing to purchase using Help to Buy.” 

The range of CG Fry & Son properties available all have the craftsmanship and quality finish that can be expected from the housebuilder.

From two-bedroom apartments in Poundbury to four-bedroom detached houses in Mere, the selection of beautiful homes is attracting a wide range of buyers.

As is typical of a CG Fry & Son home, each house is finished to the highest specification and offers a sense of space as soon as you step through the front door. 

 Under the Help to Buy scheme buyers can secure their home with a five per cent deposit and a 75 per cent mortgage. The remaining 20 per cent is paid off by the Government as an equity loan, which remains interest free for five years.